TikTok Hit With Second Lawsuit Alleging Content Moderator Neglect

Former TikTok content moderators have hit the social media platform with another lawsuit in which they are claiming damages because the job traumatized them.

Ashley Velez and Reece Young are the former contract-based content mods suing TikTok. They allege that their work required them to few unedited, unfiltered content they described as “disgusting and offensive.” They further described it as sexual and violent but used more explicit terms. The plaintiffs allege that TikTok and parent company ByteDance failed to protect moderators from harm and that they provided no support after moderators reviewed shocking content.

The complaint continued by noting that the companies required content moderators to review high volumes of disturbing content which constitutes requiring moderators to participate in unusually dangerous activities. Furthermore, the companies failed to implement widely accepted best practices to mitigate risks that are a natural part of such work.

This is the second such lawsuit in which TikTok was accused of not supporting its content moderators after viewing disturbing content.

 

 

YouTube Claims They’ve Paid Content Creators $30 Billion in Ad Revenue

The online streaming video company YouTube announced that they have paid artists, musicians, creators and media companies more than $30 billion in the just the last three years.

In the letter they sent, YouTube pointed to the Oxford Economics analysis which stated that the video hosting service and put some $16 billion dollars in to the U.S. GDP in 2019 and that YouTube supported the jobs numbering at about 345,000.

The company, owned by Google, stated that they still have some improvements to make when making sure their newest guidelines and policies are understood, especially when it came to “strikes” that would affect advertising dollars for users.

Because of the scale of the video hosting service many creators are not able to keep up easily with new policies. Recently, users have been given “strikes” because old videos don’t adhere to new policies.

YouTube said that it takes this issue serious and wants to help creators navigate their policies as the company itself navigates the political waters of different nations around the world and their laws.