iPhone Supposedly Working on MagSafe Battery Booster for iPhone 12

Remember the good old days when your phone was running out of juice and you could easily snap off the back cover, pull out the battery and swap in a new one?

Many of us remember owning more than one cell phone battery and when the first ran low we would just connect a fresh one and go on about our day.

For most phone users those days are gone. Now we rely and external batteries and rapid chargers. However, Apple is supposedly developing something better. The rumor is they are working on a battery booster that would attach magnetically to charge iPhones sans-wire and while you are using it.

iPhone developers have been, for the last year, working on a battery pack that would attach to new iPhone 12s with MagSafe technology. Apple has already employed MagSafe to connect their phones to wireless charging pads, among other accessories.

According to sources, Apple had planned to release the product last October when the iPhone 12 was released, however they were still working out software bugs.

 

 

 

Apple Cautions Pacemaker and Defibrillators About iPhone 12 Use

Apple announced recently that all iPhone 12 phones, any model, should be kept away from persons with pacemakers or defibrillators. This was posted as a support document on the Apple website.

Apple explained that its iPhones and MagSafe accessories have radios and magnets inside the technology that create electromagnetic fields that could possible interfere with different medical devices like pacemakers and defibrillators.

The company was quoted as saying, “Though all iPhone 12 models contain more magnets than prior iPhone models, they’re not expected to pose a greater risk of magnetic interference to medical devices than prior iPhone models.” They added, “Medical devices such as implanted pacemakers and defibrillators might contain sensors that respond to magnets and radios when in close contact.”

Apple is suggesting that users keep iPhones and their MagSafe devices at six inches away from implanted devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators during normal, daily use. They said that 12 inches of distance was recommended when wirelessly charging.

Users should confer with their doctors about their medical devices and those devices specific guidelines.