New Research Finds Potential Security Risk in Internet Based Home Monitoring Cameras

A new study found that some popular home security cameras could alert a tech savvy burglar whether you are home or not. The researchers claim they could tell not only if someone was home but perhaps even what they are doing by looking just at the data uploaded by the camera and not even the actual footage.

The study was conducted by Queen Mary University of London and the Chinese Academy of Science. They used data provided by a large Chinese manufacturer of IP security cameras. Consumers use the cameras to remotely monitor their homes via a video feed over the internet.

The study found that the unencrypted data upload increased when a camera was recording movement. And that they could even tell by the data—and not the video feed itself—if someone was sitting or running for example.

While researchers were quick to note it would take a fairly technically savvy criminal to passively monitor this data it isn’t out of the question that someone could create and sell a software program that takes away the need for technical know-how.

The researchers also noted that they found no evidence that this was happening regularly or at all but it is a potential loop-hole in internet based home monitoring cameras. Someone could potentially collect and compare data to decide when someone is least likely to be home. Researchers suggested companies might want to inject random data into the stream to make it more difficult to make the data useful to criminals.

As of know these cameras aren’t very “smart” (to keep costs down) and record everything. In the future cameras might be able to decide when to record or when not to. For example, pet owners would probably want to set their cameras to ignore their pets’ movements.

Pop Cultural Icon, the Segway PT, to Stop Production 15 July 2020

While the Segway PT will forever have a place in 21st century pop culture the vehicle never saw the widespread use required for its inventor’s society-changing hopes. And this summer the Segway PT will be put to rest.

Chinese company Ninebot, who bought Segway in 2015, will stop production on the Person Transport on July 15th this year. They will also say goodbye to twenty staff involved in the project at their Bedford, New Hampshire plant.

The Segway PT made waves when it was first revealed on Good Morning America in early December of 2001.

Dean Kamen, the Segway inventor, had said that cars would become obsolete and the personal transport revolution would begin. Kamen thought it absurd that 2-ton vehicles are used for short trips—and perhaps he is still right about that. But consumers spoke out and the Segway PT only accounted for 1.5% of Ninebot’s revenue. Costing between $6k-$10k only tour companies and police departments could afford it.

Even police departments have switched over to Ninebot’s less expensive electric scooters.

With many more options of electronic or electronic-assisted personal transport out there the Segway, perhaps sadly, will become a museum piece this July.

Will Apple Finally Use its Own Processors in All Products? If So, What Does That Mean?

Apple may soon announce what has long been rumor—switching from Intel processors in their Mac computers, iMacs and Macbooks, to their own Apple chip sets, which are already used in iPhones and iPads. This could happen as soon as 2021. Analysists say despite a transition period the end result would be beneficial not only to the company but its product users.

Some analysists believe that single product lines will switch over at a time instead of their entire stable of computers all at once.

Whatever devices end up with Apple’s own CPU chips users can expect better battery life and thinner, less heavy devices. This is made possible because the chips were specifically designed to be used in smartphones which already required good battery life and sleeker designs. Additionally, this might even mean the end of fans in a Mac computer.

Another huge benefit would be an even more standardized experience between tablets, phones and computers from the Apple lineup—a huge selling feature already built into their products. This then would allow app developers to create a more standard user experience across devices.

And even though Apple has made no mention of it, this could open up the possibility that Mac computers be equipped with cellular connectivity.
Apple may also be able to offer lower prices or promise performance upgrades with each generation of device since it wouldn’t be reliant on Intel to improve performance.

KFC “Trolls” Playstation and Xbox New Console Announcements

As Sony Playstation and Microsoft Xbox announced their newest consoles fast food chain KFC announced the launch of their own gaming console. Unfortunately, (?) it was just a gag.

The day after Sony revealed its PlayStation 5 console whose design was met with mixed initial reviews KFC posted a video of its new “KFConsole” on social media.
The KFConsole looks like a legitimate gaming console complete with power button, disc drive, lights etc.

The video also claimed that the KFConsole would have cross-platform compatibility. There was, however, one feature that gives away the KFC game system as a joke. The KFConsole has a built in BBQ grill called a “chicken chamber” to be employed when the gamer has a hankerin’ to grill up some chicken.

The KFConsole video claimed the system would be released on November 12th. Many are hoping they have a follow up planed for that date.

While this may seem an act of total absurdity on KFC’s part to some, they do have a standing relationship with the gaming community. Their KFC Gaming Twitter has 123.6k followers and their KFC Gaming Instrgram has 66.6k followers. They’ve also released an actual video game on Steam called “I Love Your Colonel Sanders Dating Simulator Game. The fast food company has also encouraged games to create KFC themed Minecraft builds and share them.

Additionally, they are no stranger to unusual marketing including items like KFC nail polish, KFC chicken scented sun screen or KFC Crocs.

Medical Supplies Delivered Autonomously From the Sky

Near Charlotte, NC drones—large ones with 11-foot wingspan—fly over neighborhoods, an interstate highway and a reservoir as fast as 63 mph arriving at Huntersville Medical Center.

When the drone arrives its compartment door opens and a parachute equipped package drops gently to the pavement below. This happens about 10 times a day. And after dropping its package the drone returns to the hospital distribution center.

Novant Health operates 15 hospitals in the area. This includes Huntersville Medical Center. Novant has any number of delivery choices but decided to test drones as they believe it will prove useful in future heath crises.

As delivering medical supplies will be more challenging following natural disasters or political unrest the drones may offer solutions for delivering supplies to places conventional vehicles cannot reach.

The FAA gave Novant Health a temporary waiver so they and Zipline, the startup operating the drones, could fly drones over people and beyond the visual range of the person responsible for the drone. Zipline’s drones are autonomous but are monitored by a human being.

U.S. business have been slow adopters of drone delivery as needed regulation has yet to be set. The U.S. has more crowded and complex air space than places where drone delivery is legal.

Zipline has been around 2016 and began their journey in Ghana. As of now they say they have delivered more than 110,000 medical items.

The Little Light Technology Getting Loud About Sterilization

LEDs, the now ubiquitous “Light Emitting Diode,” can be found everywhere—all over your house, your car, in the flashlights your family takes camping or uses for safety and visibility while riding bikes. The are tough, tiny, bright and energy efficient making them the perfect technology for additional research and applications.

A Mr. Zollner and his colleagues have been studying LEDs that emit ultraviolet light, particularly UV-C light, which is deadly to bacteria and viruses, including the coronavirus.

The goal of the project is to create LEDs that are more powerful, tougher and cheaper. They want to make them ten to twenty times more powerful.
His goal is to make those LEDs more powerful, robust and cheaper. Zollner believes the technology could be widely adopted and used to clean surfaces and other things in the event of another pandemic or even just during our typical flu season.

Currently the technology is strong enough to clean a close cabinet. But to clean a room the lights need to be about twenty times more powerful.

These lights are so powerful that they are dangerous to human eyes and skin.
However one firm has already found a use for them by creating the world’s first self-cleaning water bottle. To protect the human user the LEDs, seated in the lid, only function when the lid is securely sealed. Users must push down on the lid to turn on the lights. The creating LARQ claims their bottle will be clear of most bacteria and viruses in just 60 seconds.