Remember the Y2K issue? There’s another issue coming!

The Y2K problem, or bug, or just Y2K refers to when the year 2000 hit, there was a scare put into some people as computers weren’t set up for the rollover from the year 1999 to 2000. All sorts of rumors went around that time. Some thought there would be no electricity and that the power grids would come down. Many went into survival mode and bought gold, canned goods, and other commodities they thought they would need in the case they needed to barter for goods.

So this leads us to what the next “crisis” that is looming. The year 2038. We have plenty of time to prepare for this crisis but here is the gist. When digital systems started, they began with the date of January 1, 1970. So having it as 32-bit binary integer, time cannot be implemented after 03:14:07 UTC on January 19, 2038. Strings for storage are limited to 2147483647 and that would be the same as that time in January 2038 in bytes in a 32-bit system. 20 years from now, you would hardly still be running a 32-bit system you might still be running today.

Rare Apple-1 Computer up for auction this month

This is your chance to own an original Apple-1 computer from 1976. It was restored in June and is up for auction. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak made 200 of these computers.

The auction will be held by RR Auction where you can register to bid on this item. The auction begins September 25, 2018 at 1:00 PM ET. You can bid by phone or online at https://www.invaluable.com/

Tech Mystery Box

$250 for $1,932 worth of tech! So the Victor crew came across this YouTube video of someone opening up 2 boxes filled with tech returns to Amazon. It shows him unboxing 2 big boxes of tech products from Bluetooth speakers, earbuds, headphones, car speakers, and a lot of other miscellaneous products. Some of the items were clearly used and ready for the trash but some could be resold on eBay or Craig’s list. Some items were worth more than the $250 he spent on it.

So we were wondering how to purchase something like this. It turns out there are liquidators that get these types of items and sell them to people that go back and resell them again (even on Amazon). (See links below for more info.)

https://www.directliquidation.com/liquidation-102/buy-amazon-customer-returns-pallets-online/
https://www.directliquidation.com/liquidation-102/buy-resell-amazon-customer-return-pallets-electronics/

Traveling this summer?

If you have spent anytime in an airport, you see many people congregating by the outlets so they can charge their devices. Well, there seems to be some new pranks going around airports this year. People are putting fake outlet stickers in various places around the airport. Some of these outlet stickers even have a worn-out look to them.

Some people go even farther and put in fake outlet covers with double-stick tape.

You can see some people’s reactions to them on twitter.
Mashable has an article about it

Here is a YouTube video of a fake outlet for April Fools day

Here is one with fake outlet stickers:

Does Google know more than you want them to know?

Google services on Android or iPhones can store your location data, even when you try to prevent it through your device settings.

Google Maps can make a timeline of your movements, for example. It works so well that last year a warrant was served by police in North Carolina to Google to find devices near a murder scene. You can turn off your location history so the places you go will not be stored.

If you are logged into Google, go to https://www.google.com/maps/timeline?pb to see your timeline or whether it is even on. You can turn the tracking of your history on or off here: https://myaccount.google.com/activitycontrols/location?hl=en&gl=US

This may not keep Google from tracking your movements through nearby towers but it is something more you can do to make it a little more difficult for them.

Source

Chrome browser

Did you know there are a lot more settings and pages to your Google Chrome browser than you find just in your settings? To find them just type into your address bar “chrome://about” (without the quote marks) and you will find a list of pages you can access.

You will find you are actually on the first page: chrome://about. If you click it there won’t be a change. chrome://chrome will give you the update page. Some of the other pages may or may not look familiar. I clicked on chrome://dino to see what that was – it’s the dinosaur you see when you don’t have an internet connection.

The chrome://flags page will allow you to access some experimental items; chrome://bookmarks will let you see all your bookmarks. Just use caution if you make any changes to the browser.

Vertical Videos

In the past, if you uploaded a video to YouTube with a video taken from your phone, you would see the black bars on either side of it with the video in the center, tall and slim. YouTube has conceded that vertical videos are here to stay and have adapted their site to accomodate them.

YouTube makes this move on the heels of Instagram introducing IGTV, a longer form of video you can create through Instagram or with their standalone app, IGTV. Instagram itself limits you to just one minute but IGTV allows you to make a video up to an hour long. Initially that will only be available to popular uploaders but will be rolled out to evveryone eventually.

Sources:
https://www.makeuseof.com
https://productforums.google.com/forum/

Chrome Extension: PassProtect

There is a Chrome extension to help you pick better passwords. It is called PassProtect by okta. It will tell you right away if your password is in a list of data breaches. It doesn’t necessarily mean your username/email and password combination are in that list but if your password is already in a list of compromised passwords, you might want to rethink that password. You can add it to your Chrome browser.

They do not store or collect any information from you, they simply use the HaveIBeenPwned.com API to check against the list of known breaches. If you want to check a password on your own, you can check it here as well manually to see if it is in the list of breached passwords, because it is the same list. Hackers that have collected passwords will often use them to breach a site and try to guess people’s logins and if you are using a password from a breached list, and they know your email or username, you may find yourself hacked.

PassProtect

Robot Guards

A company based in Singapore, Oneberry Technologies, has developed RoboGuard. If you need surveillance, you can get a robot to do it. You would still have to man the system and watch whatever the robot found but this is an interesting concept in robotics and in surveillance.

Keyboard fixes for MacBook and MacBook Pro

A few weeks ago, Apple announced it is finally offering to repair MacBook keyboards … for free. The problems they say they will cover are:
when letters or characters repeat unexpectedly
when letters or characters don’t appear
or when keys feel sticky and do not respond consistently

After examining the keyboard, the service type will be determined and they may replace a key, keys, or the entire keyboard.

Eligible models are MacBook 12-inch 2015, 2016, and 2017; MacBook Pro 13-inch 2016, 2017 with two Thunderbolt 3 ports; MacBook Pro 13-inch 2016, 2017 with four Thunderbolt 3 ports; MacBook Pro 15-inch 2016, 2017. No other MacBooks are part of this service program.

If you have this problem, you can find an Apple Authorized Service Provider, make an appointment at an Apple Retail Store, or mail your device to the Apple Repair Center. Be sure to back up all your data before you take any of these steps.

If you have previously paid to have this problem fixed and want a refund, you can contact Apple for a refund.

Here is a funny video about the problem:

Pepper the Robot

Pepper is a humanoid robot. It is able to recognize emotions and interact with you. Pepper can move around, recognize your face, speak to you conversationally. Whether you dance or chat, Pepper is ready for you. Pepper is 1.2 meters tall.

Pepper is capable of performing customer service. He can interact with customers, help with appointments, direct to where they need to go.

Pepper is a product of SoftBank Robotics. He says she was born in Paris. SoftBank Robotics has offices in Paris, Tokyo, San Francisco and Shanghai. They also have previously developed a smaller robot called NAO about 58cm high.

With its open SDK you can enhance him as well.

Here is Tech Insider’s experience with him:

Here is SoftBank’s promo:

Find out more

Say Farewell to StumbleUpon

StumbleUpon has been around since the early 2000s. In the early days it was a fun site to just be taken to a random site. Until June 30, 2018, you can still do this. If you go there now, they will encourage you to Join Mix. Mix is a related service. You can join Mix with your Facebook or Google account or with an email address.

You can use StumbleUpon.com before it goes away this week. But you’ll have to remember your old login. Assuming you may have joined at one time and no longer use it.

How it worked is, you would go to StumbleUpon.com and join, then slick on a button to find a random cool webpage. The company that owns Mix.com, Expa, wants to take Mix.com to the next level and combine social and semantic personalization to the user experience. They want to make it easy to organize your content into collections. They will be transitioning StumbleUpon accounts over to Mix.

Some other companies under the Expa umbrella are Uber (driver service), Haus (helps you sell your own house and keep more of the money than through a broker), Prefer (a way to grow your business through referrals), Ando (food delivery service), Spot (a way to find things to do based on referals), Operator (a way to find what you are looking for). These are a few of Expa companies.

Funny how things never change…

The Victor crew happened upon a an article about an article. TheVerge.com showed a clipping of a news article from a 1996 copy of the Wall Street Journal. The clipping shows that even back in 1996, there were privacy concerns.

Concerns with privacy about such things as cookies, encryption, junk email. We recently wrote about the blast of Terms of Service you’ve been seeing. Most of them address all these issues within them.

The only way to truly protect your privacy is to be aware of what is being collected. Don’t just shrug off all those terms and privacy legal pages. Read them. If they want something you don’t want to give, then just stop using that service, app, website, etc. If the site or app has privacy settings, go into them and limit your exposure. Limit who can see your posts, photos, or information. Sometimes you can even set it so you need to approve who can friend or follow you.

View the original full Wall Street Journal article here.

Need Ideas for Father’s Day?

What dad doesn’t like tech! The Victor crew thought they would look for ideas that are out there just in time for Dad’s special Day this week. This list is not exhaustive but maybe it will spur something you hadn’t thought of.

TV streaming device:
Roku
Apple TV
Chromecast

Headphones/Earbuds

eReader:
Nook
Kindle Fire
Kindle Paperwhite

AI device:
Google Home
Amazon Echo
Apple HomePod

Fitness Tracker

Video games

Charging dock for all his gadgets

Subscription service:
Amazon Prime
Spotify
Sirius XM
Pandora
Hulu
Netflix

Does 2-Factor Authentication Keep You Safe?

Not always. The Victor crew found an article/video that demonstrates how you have to be very careful even if you use 2-factor authentication in place. The trouble can occur when a user clicks a link sent in a phishing attack. The email may look legitimate but it may have the real site name misspelled.

The most important take away it to stop and think before click a link even if you think it comes from a legitimate source. If you receive a message from a major site, most likely you can just go to that site, log in, and see any notifications someone may have sent rather than looking at emails that are generated.

You can see how it 2-factor authentication is bypassed in this demonstration by Kevin Mitnick from KnowBe4.com.

BattleBots

“It’s robot fighting time!” That’s what you hear at the of BattleBots. People make robots and fight each other in an arena.

The show started on Comedy Central in 2000 and ran for five seasons ending in December 2002. It was briefly revived in 2015 for six episodes on ABC. It ran for a seventh season in 2016. It then found itself on both Discovery Channel and Science channel for its eighth season just this month.

Many of the robots are back again. They are run by engineers, MIT students, plumbers, just to name a few. BattleBots is an offshoot of Robot Wars. When Robot Wars disappeared, some of the robot builders left behind started BattleBots, Inc.

Just like other matches, there are weight classes. Lightweight is about 60 pounds, Middleweight is 120 pounds, Heavyweight is 220 pounds, and Superheavyweight is 340 pounds. They last three minutes per round and are done in a 48′ x 48′ glass box. Not only do the robots battle each other but there are a few obstacles in the arena as well such as a sledgehammer in the corner, spinners and spike strips and in floor, augurs that roll around on the sides that opponents try to push the robots into.

Some contestants have mini-bots that roam around too. Sometimes you will see sparks, flames, smoking, or even tears (from the drivers.) It’s a fun watch so try to see it sometime.

Terms of Service

It seems we’ve all been just bombarded with Terms of Service. They may be from credit card companies, banks, apps, or anything else you may get emails from or are signed up to. So why so many and why now?

The answer is most likely GDPR. This stands for General Data Protection Regulation. This is something that the EU (European Union) has adopted for web directives to protect its citizens’ data. This is going into effect May 25, 2018.

When you give personal data, it is their right to know what is collected, why, for how long. It also gives the user to withdraw their consent at any time. That means they may ask a company to delete their information or stop using it.

This all applies to any company whether they are in the EU countries or not. EU countries include Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom.

Find out more here:
ec.europa.eu/

The New Gmail

Gmail rolled out the new Gmail recently. We thought we’d give it a try. It didn’t really look any different once we set it up. Until we wanted to check in our contacts. We no longer could just click on the name Gmail on the top left to get to our contacts. This meant a Google search to try to find it.

Here is where it is – on the top right is the app grid. Find contacts in there. You may need to move it up to the top so you can access them quickly. If Contacts icon doesn’t show, click More at the bottom of the first page and you should see it on the second. You can simply grab it and move it to the top.

The first image shows the grid without the Contacts app. The second image shows it on the second page under More. The third shows the Contacts app on the top right.

Gmail App Grid Gmail App Grid Gmail App Grid

Another difference we found is that Labs was missing. Labs were experimental addons you could enable to try different things.

Blast from the Past

Websites have changed over the years. The Google.com of today isn’t quite like the one of yesteryear. Same with Amazon.com or Netflix.com or Facebook.com and many others. A video editing company by the name of Kapwing has been curating websites for their Museum of Websites. You will also find Reddit.com, NewYorkTimes.com, Twitter.com, and Pinterest.com and more!

They have a section within their website with a gallery of how famous websites have changed over the years. They are slowly working on getting more and more. The oldest one is Yahoo!, which has been around since 1995.

Somehow, we don’t think the earlier craigslist.org will show much change over time. It seems its retro look hasn’t changed much since the first time we’ve seen it.

You can join the email list to know when they put new ones up

Does Windows 10 really shut down?

Windows 10 uses something called fast startup mode. By default, this is enabled and it does just that – allows you start up faster. What you are really doing instead of shutting down is hibernating. It caches everything so it will all load faster when you “turn it back on.”

To control what happens you can go to Control Panel > Power Options > and click “Choose what the power button do” and you can change what you want to do. If you are on a laptop, you can choose what happens when you close the lid as well.

If you really want to shut down, you will have to do a restart. This makes the old “if you have problems, reboot” really mean it.

If you are feeling adventuresome, you can create your own power plan as well.

Windows Defender Browser Protection

There is an extension for the Chrome browser called Windows Defender Browser Protection. It extends your Defender protection to include your browser. It will keep you from accidentally clicking to phishing site. You can also turn the protection on or off. If you click to a link from an email it will help by reporting to you that the website is unsafe.

After you install it on your browser, you will see a small defender icon on the top of your browser. You can click it and then you will see the dropdown (shown below). You can turn on or off temporarily.

Windows Defender Chrome Addon

Get the extension for Chrome here.

Learn more about how it works from Microsoft.

Beginning days of Email

Remember when people were first getting connected in the late 90s and early 2000s? Emails would travel round and round to everybody and their friends and family. No one would think twice about getting a joke and feeling the obligation to pass it on to everyone in their address book. Not so much anymore.

I wax nostalgic remembering all the emails and then going to Snopes.com to look up the stories to see if they were true. Snopes was the “fake news” buster everyone would check with. Fake news can come in different format these days. It can be a tweet, a post, or even a news article. Snopes still has it covered. They have changed the format of their website quite a bit. They have sections called What’s New, Hot 50, Fact Check, News, Video, and Archive. They even have a Random button that will bring a different item every time you click it.

While looking at their site, we found they are trying to raise some money to keep going. You can visit their GoFundMe page.

So whether it’s a preposterous post, nonsensical news, or a totally thin tweet, you can still look it up at snopes.com!

Duolingo

Duolingo is a way to learn another language online…for free. You can do it through your browser or their app. They have Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese (Beta), Dutch, Swedish, Irish, Turkish, Norwegian, Danish (we like cheese, please), Polish, Korean (Beta), Hebrew, Greek, Chinese, Vietnamese, Esperanto, Welsh, Ukrainian, Hungarian (Beta), Romanian, Swahili, High Valyrian (really?), Czech (Beta), Klingon (Beta). Indonesian, Hindi, and Arabic are also in the works and coming soon. These are listed in order of how many people are currently learning these languages. Spanish has the most with 120 million people learning.

Wait! Klingon? Yes they have Klingon in Beta with 40.6K learners already. All these languages are currently on the website but not all are available through their apps yet.

The languages offer different rates of learning. They start at Casual for 5 mins per day, then Regular is 10 mins per day, Serious level is 15 mins per day and Insane is 20 mins per day. They will gear the lessons to your time level. You will need to make a sign-in to keep your place. You can create a separate login or use Facebook or Google account login.

April Fools 2018

So this year, April Fools Day was on a Sunday. Easter Sunday no less. So some of us may have missed some of the jokes on the Internet. Here are a few you might have missed.

From Google Israel:
This one is about Hummus API – groundbreaking technology!

Here is the Bad Joke Detector:
Clean your device of bad jokes.

From Google Japan:
Gboard – a keyboard you can use in different ways (subtitled)

From ThinkGeek:
A Rick and Morty Screaming Sun Alarm Clock (rather annoying)

From DuoLingo:
Brewolingo – learn a new language while you drink

http://brewolingo.duolingo.com/

Tired of Ads?

Some sites make their money with ads. But lets face it, sometimes they get to be too much and intrusive. With Chrome tightening rules on ads, there are still sites with ads if you use Safari on your iOS device. The Victor crew has a few solutions for you.

Try using a different browser. Especially if there’s a site that has ads that tend to redirect you. Browsers we have tried and had good results with are:

Adblock Browser:
Made by the people who make AdBlocker extensions.
AdBlock Browser in App Store
AdBlock Browser for Android

Brave Browser:
Made with built-in AdBlocker, tracking and security protection
Brave Browser in App Store
Brave Browser in Google Play Store

Try using Adblock extension for Safari:
Simply install and then go to settings >> Safari >> Content blockers >> turn on AdBlocker extension.
AdBlock extension for Safari on iOS

Other things you can do – turn off javascript from Safari:
Settings >> Safari >> Advanced. Turn off JavaScript.
We’ve used this to keep ads from redirecting to other sites.