China Increases Restrictions on Online Gaming for Minors

Recently China has banned gamers under 18 years of age from playing online games during the weekdays and is limiting them to just three hours of game play on weekends. This is a considerable increase on the country’s huge gaming industry.

The specifics state that minors will be allowed only an hour of online gaming time between 8 pm and 9 pm on Friday, weekends and public holidays according to statement released by Chinese media watch dog, the National Press and Publication Administration (NPPA). It was posted by state news agency Xinhua.

Previously in 2019 the agency had set relatively lighter limits on online gaming for minors to 90 minutes on weekdays and three hours on weekends for minors. Authorities have stated in both cases the restrictions are intended to protect children from becoming video game addicts.

The NPPA stated that the rules were being put in place “at the beginning of the new [school] semester, putting specific requirements for preventing the addiction to online games, and protecting the healthy growth of minors.”

 

Twitter Announces New Protective Feature

Twitter is increasing efforts to provide user-side tools for those users who are experiencing harassment to help themselves.

The social media platform announced that it will be testing a new feature called “Safety Mode.” This new feature is intended to protect users from being overwhelmed by harmful tweets or unwanted replies or mentions. The feature will block, temporarily, accounts from interacting with users to whom the harasser has sent harmful speech and repeated or uninvited replies and mentions.

Over the years Twitter has often bored criticism for the recurrent use of hateful or abusive content submitted to its platform by users. There are even rare and unfortunate cases where the harmful content has extended to the real world, most often when the target of the content is a marginalized group.

Twitter hasn’t spoken of any major protective features since 2017 when it released, among other features, its “safe search” function along with the user’s ability to block potentially abusive or “low-quality” tweets to appear in their conversations.

 

The Famous Analog Computer Toy

While most may not think of the Rubik cube as a computer, the famous toy is a very basic analog computer.

The Rubik’s Cube has been around since the 70s. Invented by a Hungarian professor named Erno Rubik, his first prototype was made in 1974. When he had built his first cube, it took him a month to solve it. He got his patent in 1975 for his “Magic Cube”. In 1979, it was presented to toy fairs in various countries.

Tom Kremer, a toy specialist with a passion, convinced the Ideal Toy Company to pick this up as a product. The first thing they did was change the name from Magic Cube to Rubik’s Cube and launched it in 1980. By 1981 it was a world-wide craze. Through the years it has been reworked and made even faster. In 2017 they released the Rubik’s Speedcube.

The First Programmable, General Purpose Computer

ENIAC or Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer) was the first programmable, electronic, general-purpose digital computer. It was Turing-complete and able to solve “a large class of numerical problems” through reprogramming.

Although ENIAC was designed and primarily used to calculate artillery firing tables for the United States Army’s Ballistic Research Laboratory (which later became a part of the Army Research Laboratory), its first program was a study of the feasibility of the thermonuclear weapon.

ENIAC was completed in 1945 and first put to work for practical purposes on December 10, 1945.

ENIAC was formally dedicated at the University of Pennsylvania on February 15, 1946, and was heralded as a “Giant Brain” by the press. It had a speed on the order of one thousand times faster than that of electro-mechanical machines; this computational power, coupled with general-purpose programmability, excited scientists and industrialists alike. The combination of speed and programmability allowed for thousands more calculations for problems, as ENIAC calculated a trajectory in 30 seconds that took a human 20 hours (allowing one ENIAC to displace 2,400 humans).

The completed machine was announced to the public the evening of February 14, 1946, and formally dedicated the next day at the University of Pennsylvania, having cost almost $500,000 (approximately equivalent to $7,283,000 in 2020). It was formally accepted by the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps in July 1946. ENIAC was shut down on November 9, 1946, for a refurbishment and a memory upgrade, and was transferred to Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland in 1947. There, on July 29, 1947, it was turned on and was in continuous operation until 11:45 p.m. on October 2, 1955.