New App Could Calculate Your Grocery Trip’s Carbon Footprint

Many consumers these days are concerned about what the environmental impact of the products they buy are. While many “green” products provide this kind of information via a website or the product packaging, most of what the average consumer buys can be quite the mystery when it comes to the products carbon footprint.

A Dublin-based startup name Evocoo could soon make it very easy for consumers to figure out what the environmental impact of their grocery bill is. As about 1/3rd of third-world carbon waste comes from the production and distribution of food.

The app will literally use their grocery receipt, in fact.

Users will simply photograph their grocery receipt with the Evocco app. The app then uses the printed text and machine learning (AI) to calculate the carbon footprint of that grocery bill by combining and calculating data like the store location and the weight, type and origin of a food product and comparing this against a database.

Ideally users would be left with a more accurate idea of how they eat affects the world.

 

 

 

Google Adds Expanded Feature: Indoor Live View

Google has announced a new feature called Indoor Live View. The feature uses your phones camera and overlays relevant graphics and icons on top of what the phone’s camera sees. This would help the user find a particular store in a mall or perhaps a bathroom in a train station.

Google stated that the feature is more interactive than the existing Google Maps’ existing indoor maps and is the evolution of the city-street navigation feather that launched two years ago. It is currently available on both iOS and Android. For now it use is limited to some malls in Newark, New Jersey, Los Angeles, San Fransisco, Long Island and Seattle. In the coming months Tokyo and Zurich will be added to the list.

This is just one of a bunch of features Google has added to Maps in the last few years which has long ago moved beyond just giving drivers turn-by-turn directions.

 

 

 

 

Laptop Buying Guide for Graduating Seniors

Many graduating seniors will be receiving laptops as graduation gifts before going off to college. Here are some “myths” about laptops and some other items to consider before selecting the best laptop in your price range.

Myth: More RAM will always speed up your PC.

Facts: It doesn’t hurt but it doesn’t always help. For basic usage (Microsoft Office, web browsing, streaming, social media and email) 8 to 16 gigs of RAM will likely be plenty. Special applications for graphic design, video or audio editing may require more.

Myth: A CPU with more cores is always faster.

Facts: Each “core” in a multicore processor allows the computer to better allocate its processing power to multiple applications or processes running at once. If one is only running one program at a time more “cores” won’t increase the power or speed of the computer. For basic usage, a faster CPU with less cores is probably preferable.

Myth: You always want the fastest CPU and graphics card you can afford.

Facts: Fast CPUs and power graphics cards will run hotter and run down a laptop battery faster. For many students, longer battery life will probably be more important than having the fastest computer. Unless the student is a gamer or using specialty software that requires more resources like a graphics card or a powerful CPU, buying a laptop with the most powerful components may be a waste of money that could be spent on an extended warranty or other necessities.

Mac (Apple) vs. PC (Windows)

The average student probably doesn’t need an expensive Mac Book Pro or other Mac laptop. Those going into graphic design, audio or video fields may want to invest in one however. Consumers should also know that much of the popular software in these fields now runs on PC (Windows) and there are many fine high-end PCs that compete with Mac laptops for power and speed. Students with special computing needs should consult with an advisor in their program before buying a computer.

Tablets/iPads

These days a table or hybrid is a real option that many students may prefer for portability and cost. Google tools like Google Docs as well as Microsoft 365 both run on iOS, Android and Windows tablets and hybrids. These tablets will also run all your student’s social media and streaming apps. Bluetooth keyboards and keyboard cases are available to make the devices easier to use for schoolwork.

 

 

Secure Passwords and Your Online Accounts

We’ve talked about passwords before and yet it is such an important thing because of all the security breaches we see. Some people say they don’t have anything that important protected behind a password, so it doesn’t matter. Or they say they need to use the same password for everything.

This is an unsafe practice and a dangerous attitude to have about passwords and your personal data.

Think about all your accounts where you have purchased items, or your banking or credit card accounts. Do you really want to use the same password for everything? Once they breach one account, say your email, they can look through that to find what other accounts you are subscribed to and have a field day. This is even how identities are stolen.

Using the service LastPass is one of the best ways to secure your accounts. Once you download LastPass, set it up with a hard to hack easy to remember password. An unusual set of simple words and an attached string of numbers that is also easy to remember is a good place to start. You can then import all the passwords saved to your browsers. Once you have LastPass you can also run a kind of audit check for recommendations on which passwords to change – it will show you duplicates or not so secure passwords you already have.