Sanitizing Your Cellphone With UV Light?

Demand for high-tech solutions to sanitizing our devices completely and in a way that is safe for our devices has increased greatly. One company, PhoneSoap, has developed a device intended to completely sanitize your cellphone along with other person items like keys and credit cards.

The PhoneSoap 3 device allows one to disinfect your phone and other small personal items with ultra-violet light. The PhoneSoap 3 cost $80.

It also employs reflective technology on the inside of the device to make sure all surfaces of the cellphone and other items are being sanitized on all sides.

While this might sound like science fiction to some, UV rays are being used not just for techy people’s smart phones. Hospitals are now using UV light to sanitize facemasks worn by nurses and doctors to help extend the useful lifespan of masks that may be in short supply.

UV light attacks viruses and bacteria at their core—their DNA—and kills them. This allows medical staff to get three uses out of a mask which are typically single use. It also now allows you to safely sterilize your hand held personal items w/o gunking them up with disinfectants or having to remember to carry alcohol swabs with you.

EBay Sells eBay Classifieds for $9.2 Billion

EBay’s classified ads business, one of the oldest businesses on the internet, just sold to Adevinta (Norway) for $9.2 billion in order for them to create the largest online classifieds company.

Today classifieds online aren’t a huge business. Only about 3% of the $125 billion online advertising market (2019 according to Interactive Advertising Bureau).

However, in their day Craigslist and what became eBay Classifieds were some of the largest on the web.

EBay Classifieds Group was started 25 years ago as the AuctionWeb. EBay’s classifieds business was once known as DBA which was a popular, Danish all-classifieds newspaper that started publishing in the 1970s far before the idea that everyone would have a network connected computer in their home was commonplace. It decided to give the web a go in 1995.

EBay bought DBA along with lots of other similar businesses in 2008 to form the eBay Classifieds Group. However, classifieds weren’t ever at the center of eBay’s profit ambitions and in the first quarter of 2020 accounted for just 10% of the company’s total revenue.

Now, among a growing group of other non-central businesses like Skype, PayPal and StubHub, eBay decided to dump another branch of its business as it struggles to keep up with its primary and much larger rival Amazon.

 

Apple News, News+ Adding Audio and More

Apple has announced that will being to create its own daily news overview podcats, Apple News Today. Former WNYC hosts Durate Geraldino and Shumita Basu have been hired been hired as co-hosts. Apple News Today will run Mondays-Fridays in the morning and will be filed in Apple’s News and Podcast apps. The 10-minute podcast will attempt to brief listeners on the day’s news.

The company is also going to be creating audio versions of print stories. These will be available in Apple News+, Apple’s subscription service that gives users access to top magazines and newspapers.

Apple’s writers and editors will create about 20 audio stories a week, according to Apple. These will be narrated by professional voice actors, though there is no word on them hiring “names you would know.” This service will only be available through the Apple News+ subscription.

Apple will also add an Audio tab to its News app. This is where users will find the Apple News Today podcast and the new audio stories. Apple’s new audio features will also be available on their CarPlay system.

Apple also announced that users will have more access to local news through both Apple News and News+. The areas will include Houston, the Bay Area, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco.

News+ subscribers will also have access to seven local papers: The Idaho Statesman, The Kansas City Star, The Charlotte Observer, the Miami Herald, The News & Observer, the State and The Sacramento Bee.

New Research Finds Potential Security Risk in Internet Based Home Monitoring Cameras

A new study found that some popular home security cameras could alert a tech savvy burglar whether you are home or not. The researchers claim they could tell not only if someone was home but perhaps even what they are doing by looking just at the data uploaded by the camera and not even the actual footage.

The study was conducted by Queen Mary University of London and the Chinese Academy of Science. They used data provided by a large Chinese manufacturer of IP security cameras. Consumers use the cameras to remotely monitor their homes via a video feed over the internet.

The study found that the unencrypted data upload increased when a camera was recording movement. And that they could even tell by the data—and not the video feed itself—if someone was sitting or running for example.

While researchers were quick to note it would take a fairly technically savvy criminal to passively monitor this data it isn’t out of the question that someone could create and sell a software program that takes away the need for technical know-how.

The researchers also noted that they found no evidence that this was happening regularly or at all but it is a potential loop-hole in internet based home monitoring cameras. Someone could potentially collect and compare data to decide when someone is least likely to be home. Researchers suggested companies might want to inject random data into the stream to make it more difficult to make the data useful to criminals.

As of know these cameras aren’t very “smart” (to keep costs down) and record everything. In the future cameras might be able to decide when to record or when not to. For example, pet owners would probably want to set their cameras to ignore their pets’ movements.